Parenting Books To Create A Positive Parent-Child Relationship

I would have loved a manual on how to raise my kids when I took them home from the hospital.  Literally, a step-by-step guide on each of them.  Since this magical manual does not exist, I had to find other ways to find answers to my parenting questions.  In this search I have read a ton of parenting books.  A lot of them were ok, some were terrible, and a few were eye-opening and really hit the nail on the head with how I want to raise my kids. 

I share my favorites with you today hoping they may help you on this crazy road we call parenthood. Keep up the good work, mamas!

No Bad Kids- Janet Lansbury

A straightforward, practical, and easy-to-use guide with techniques on managing the difficult aspects of parenthood.  One lesson that stood out for me was to change my reaction.  I shouldn’t take my child’s poor behavior personally; tantrums are developmentally appropriate and I need to manage my response to them.  “Respond calmly like a CEO” and speak in the first person.  I subscribe to the author’s email and Facebook updates for free resources on parenting, but I love that I have a copy of this book on hand.

How To Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk–Adele Faber & Elaine Mazlish

Seriously.  I felt like I was speaking a different language with my toddler most days.  This book has simple and effective tools to use when speaking to your child on handling emotions, getting cooperation, resolving conflict, problem solving, and more!  I loved the reminder to make things silly for your kids when needing cooperation. (“Please, let me get on your foot, says Mr. Sock!”)  Silly voices and making a game works wonders at getting out the door for a stalling toddler.

 

 

Peaceful Parent, Happy Siblings: How To Stop The Fighting & Raise Friends For Life- Dr. Laura Markham

Man, I wish my parents would have had this book.  While my kids are small and I haven’t faced a lot of the issues discussed in this book, it was a great read to prepare myself in how my role as a parent will play in creating a lasting sibling bond.  I will definitely be coming back to this book again and again.

It’s OK Not to Share…And Other Renegade Rules for Raising Competent and Compassionate Kids- Heather Schumaker

Again, there are so many great parenting tips here, but I have found in practice these things are working with my two kids.  You don’t need to share your toy; you can have it as long as you want, and the next person gets it when you are done.  Play wise, how often do you find yourself telling your kid to not do something?  Why?  Kids need to explore and do things outside of the box. You learn here that any type of play is ok as long as it is not hurting people or property. 

Happy Kid Handbook: How to Raise Joyful Children in a Stressful World- Katie Hurley

We all worry about the world we are sending our kids into. I love how this book makes you look at the big picture. What kind of people do I want my kids to become and how do I parent them to be the best versions of themselves? Being happy ourselves will help raise happy kids, so start there.  Another good reminder–parent your child how they need to be parented and look at the most important things we can teach them: to slow down and play, to be kind and to have empathy, how to resolve conflict and to cope with stress, and to follow their passions. 

What parenting books made a difference in your life as a mama?

 

Megan
Megan, an Iowa native from West Branch, shares her home with husband Cody, two adorable kiddos Charlie and Gwen and their pet dust bunnies. When she is not smooching on them she is trying to change lives as a social worker. You can find her running endless errands in Liza the mini(van) or on a hot date with her treadmill watching IPTV. Since having baby #2 she is drowning in laundry and love and someday hopes to foster or adopt if fate will allow.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.