15 Picture Books for Celebrating Latinx Heritage Month

September 15 – October 15 is Latinx Heritage Month, also known as National Hispanic Heritage Month, a period to formally recognize the contributions and influence of Latinx peoples to the history, culture, and achievements of the United States.

But these picture books by Latinx authors are great to share with the children in your life anytime!


Alma and How she Got her Name by Juana Martinez-Neal

When Alma Sofia Esperanza José Pura Candela asks her father why she has so many names, she hears the story of her name and learns about her grandparents.

Looking for Bongo by Eric Velasquez

When a boy’s abuela accuses him of being careless with his beloved Bongo, he devises a trap and catches the toy thief red-handed!

Dreamers by Yuyi Morales

An illustrated picture book autobiography in which award-winning author Yuyi Morales tells her own immigration story.

15 Picture Books for Celebrating Latinx Heritage Month

Islandborn by Junot Diaz

Lola was just a baby when her family left the Island, so when she has to draw it for a school assignment, she asks her family, friends, and neighbors about their memories of her homeland . . . and in the process, comes up with a new way of understanding her own heritage.

My Papi Has a Motorcycle by Isabel Quintero

When Daisy Ramona zooms around her neighborhood with her papi on his motorcycle, she sees the people and places she’s always known. She also sees a community that is rapidly changing around her. But as the sun sets purple-blue-gold behind Daisy Ramona and her papi, she knows that the love she feels will always be there.

Planting Stories: The Life of Librarian and Storyteller Pura Belpre by Anika Aldamuy Denise

An inspiring picture book biography of storyteller, puppeteer, and New York City’s first Puerto Rican librarian, who championed bilingual literature.

Vamos! Let’s Go Eat by Raul the Third

Little Lobo, a Mexican American, and Bernabé, his dog, gather tacos, frutas picadas, cuernos, and more and deliver them to los luchadores preparing for Lucha Libre 5000!

15 Picture Books for Celebrating Latinx Heritage Month

The Boy Who Touched the Stars by Jose M. Hernandez

Every night when he was a boy, José M. Hernández would look out the window and stare at the stars. They were different colors: blue, yellow, and white. Some were larger and brighter than others, and some twinkled as if they were alive. Later, when he saw man land on the moon on TV, he knew he wanted to be an astronaut.

Salsa Lullaby by Jen Arena

Parents put their young daughter to sleep with the help of some music and dancing.

Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation by Duncan Tonatiuh

Years before the landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling Brown v. Board of Education, Sylvia Mendez, an eight-year-old girl of Mexican and Puerto Rican heritage, played an instrumental role in Mendez v. Westminster, the landmark desegregation case of 1946 in California.

Imagine! by Raul Colon

When a boy visits an art museum and one of the paintings comes to life, he has an afternoon of adventure and discovery that changes how he sees the world ever after.

15 Picture Books for Celebrating Latinx Heritage Month

Rita and Ralph’s Rotten Day by Carmen Agra Deedy

Rita and Ralph live on neighboring hills and they are best friends, until a silly accident while goofing around ends up with both of them angry and unhappy — and they both need to find a way to heal the break in their relationship.

Drum Dream Girl: How One Girl’s Courage Changed Music by Margarita Engle

Follows a young Cuban girl in the 1930s as she strives to become a drummer, despite being continually reminded that only boys play the drums. Includes a note about Millo Castro Zaldarriaga, who inspired the story, and Anacaona, the all-girl dance band she formed with her sisters.

Los Gatos Black on Halloween by Marisa Montes

Easy to read, rhyming text about Halloween night incorporates Spanish words, from las brujas riding their broomsticks to los monstruos whose monstrous ball is interrupted by a true horror.

Mango, Abuela, and Me by Meg Medina

When Mia’s Abuela comes to live with Mia and her family, she helps her learn English while Mia learns Spanish, both with the help of a parrot named Mango.


Do you have any book recommendations for celebration National Hispanic Heritage Month?

Avatar
Anne is a kinda crunchy, kinda unapologetically corner-cutting mom who has lived in Iowa City since 2004. She is a graduate student in Library and Information Science at the University of Iowa and works in the Children's Services department at the Iowa City Public Library. Before going back to school, she was a stay-at-home mom to her two daughters for several years, and took her children to the library multiple times a week. Basically, she has lived at the library for about a decade. Which is fine, because her biggest passion in life is books. When not reading, Anne also enjoys hiking, low-budget road-tripping, and drinking craft beer on a patio.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.